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The Bob Edwards Show

September 2007

 

Saturday/Sunday, September 1-2, 2007

 

New York Times reporter John Leland most recent book is Why Kerouac Matters: The Lessons of On the Road (They’re Not What You Think). In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s Beat novel, Bob talks with Leland about the importance and lasting effects of “On the Road.”

 

Writer Joyce Johnson’s memoirs “Minor Characters” details her relationships with many key figures of the Beat movement and focuses particularly on the years she lived with writer Jack Kerouac. Joyce talks with Bob about 1957 and 1958, when Kerouac rose from obscurity to fame with the publication of “On the Road.” This month marks the book’s 50th anniversary.

 

Bob talks with journalist and former soldier Brian Mockenhaupt. He served two tours in Iraq, is now a writer for Esquire and recently returned to Baghdad to profile the troop surge for the magazine.

 

Bob talks with Rolling Stone music critic Anthony DeCurtis about some new releases.

 

 

 

Monday, September 3, 2007

It’s Labor Day and what better day to bring back Bob’s interview with James Green, professor of labor history at the University of Massachusetts. His latest book is Death in the Haymarket: A Story of Chicago, the First Labor Movement, and the Bombing that Divided Gilded Age America. Next, Bob talks with scholar Lauren Coodley about Upton Sinclair’s life and his role as one of America’s original muckrakers. And finally, Bob travels to Chicago to explore Sinclair’s slaughterhouses with historian Dominic Pacyga (puh-SEE-guh) and current-day slaughterhouse owner Dennis Chiappetti .

 

Tuesday, September 4, 2007

Former Washington Post reporter Linda Perlstein (pearl-steen) spent a year in an elementary school to observe the No Child Left Behind Act in action. Bob talks to Perlstein about the mixed results she discovered and the private influence over public education. She’s the author of Tested: One American School Struggles to Make the Grade and Not Much Just Chillin’: The Hidden Lives of Middle Schoolers. Then, Bob talks with educator Dr. Rudolph F. “Rudy” Crew about his plans to reshape public education. A former teacher and superintendent, Dr. Crew’s new book is ONLY CONNECT: The Way to Save our Schools.

 

Wednesday, September 5, 2007

Bob talks to Randall Kenan, an acclaimed writer, Guggenheim fellow, and UNC English professor. In his new book, The Fire This Time Kenan pays homage to writer James Baldwin in this part memoir, part literary commentary.

 

Thursday, September 6, 2007

King Kaufman is back to talk about sports – baseball, college football and the NFL.

Bob talks with Richard D. Kahlenberg, author of Though Liberal: Albert Shanker and the Battles Over Schools, Unions, Race, and Democracy.

 

Friday, September 7, 2007

Just over a year ago, Fidel Castro, the iconic leader of Cuba’s socialist government transferred power to his brother Raul. How is the Cuban government handling its first change of power in nearly 50 years and where does the island nation stand amongst the powers of the modern world? Bob talks to Cuba expert and Florida International University Professor Marifeli Perez-Stable about the Cuban government and the challenges it faces moving forward.

Johnny Pacheco is a living legend of Latin music. In 1963, Pacheco co-founded Fania records, which gave a home to Latin musicians and singers that would go on to gain world stardom.  The film, ‘El Cantante’ starring Marc Anthony and Jennifer Lopez is a biopic of the Puerto Rican singer Hector Lavoe.  Johnny Pacheco talks with Bob about his career, Fania Records and the late Hector Lavoe.

 

Saturday/Sunday, September 8-9, 2007

 Former Washington Post reporter Linda Perlstein spent a year in an elementary school to observe the No Child Left Behind Act in action. Bob talks to Perlstein about the mixed results she discovered and the private influence over public education. She’s the author of Tested: One American School Struggles to Make the Grade and Not Much Just Chillin’: The Hidden Lives of Middle Schooler .

Bob talks with educator Dr. Rudolph F. “Rudy” Crew about his plans to reshape public education. A former teacher and superintendent, Dr. Crew’s new book is ONLY CONNECT: The Way to Save our Schools.

Finally, Bob speaks with author Paul Dickson about Burgess Unabridged: A Classic Dictionary of Words You Have Always Needed, by turn of the century author Gelett Burgess, and Dickson’s own Family Words: A Dictionary of the Secret Language of Families . Burgess Unabridged, published in 1914, introduced a playful spirit of linguistic experimentation into the American cultural landscape, which has been diligently documented by Dickson in his various works on American slang.

Bob talks with Richard D. Kahlenberg, author of Tough Liberal: Albert Shanker and the Battles Over Schools, Unions, Race, and Democracy.

Bob talks with Boston based cognitive neuroscientist and reading expert Maryanne Wolf about her new book Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain.

 

Monday, September 10, 2007

Bob talks politics with regular Monday guest David Broder of The Washington Post . Then, Bob talks to Matt Bai about the grassroots struggle between party leadership, bloggers, and funders to define the Democratic Party. Bai writes about national politics for The New York Times Magazine and is the author of The Argument: Billionaires, Bloggers, and the Battle to Remake Democratic Politics. And finally, movie reviewer David Kipen joins Bob to talk about new releases and about The Big Read, a program headed by the National Endowment for the Arts designed to encourage reading.

 

Tuesday, September 11, 2007

Bob talks to Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele who wrote Billions over Baghdad, appearing in the October issue of Vanity Fair. The pair attempted to track the $9 billion dollars in American cash that has disappeared since it was shipped to Iraq. Then, former Marine and Newsweek reporter Malcolm MacPherson has just written Hocus Potus, a satirical look at post-invasion Iraq.

 

Wednesday , September 12, 2007

For the first and possibly last time, all the surviving astronauts from the Apollo missions come together to share their stories in the film In the Shadow of the Moon. Bob talks with director David Sington about making this film and the stories of the only 12 people to have walked on the moon. Then, Bob talks to director David Cronenberg about violence, human nature, and filmmaking. In 2005 he directed History of Violence starring Viggo Mortensen, who also stars in Cronenberg’s latest film Eastern Promises.

 

Thursday, September 13, 2007

Bob spends the hour with Bill Siemering, one of the founding fathers of public radio. He wrote NPR’s mission statement and launched the network’s first signature program “All Things Considered.” Siemering is now the President of Developing Radio Partners, an organization dedicated to supporting independent radio stations in young, developing democracies.

 

Friday, September 14, 2007

Bob talks with Washington Post editor Rajiv Chandrasekaran who analyzes all the recent Iraq reports and testimony.

Dominican-American writer Junot Diaz was hailed as a rising star when he published Drown, a short story collection, in 1996. Now, more than a decade later, Diaz has written his first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. Bob will talk with Diaz about the new book, his decade of literary silence, and the special pressures that come with being identified as the voice of a people.

 

 

Saturday/Sunday, September 15-16, 2007

 Bob talks to Washington Post editor Rajiv Chandrasekaran as he analyzes all the recent Iraq reports and testimonies.

 

Bob talks to Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele who wrote “Billions over Baghdad,” appearing in the October issue of Vanity Fair. The pair attempted to track the nine billion dollars in American cash that has disappeared since it was shipped to Iraq.

 

Bob talks to director David Cronenberg about violence, human nature, and filmmaking. In 2005 he directed “History of Violence” starring Viggo Mortensen, who also stars in Cronenberg’s latest film“Eastern Promises.”

 

Just over a year ago, Fidel Castro, the iconic leader of Cuba’s socialist government transferred power to his brother Raul. How is the Cuban government handling its first change of power in nearly 50 years and where does the island nation stand amongst the powers of the modern world? Bob talks to Cuba expert and Florida International University Professor Marifeli Perez-Stable about the Cuban government and the challenges it faces moving forward.

 

Dominican-American writer Junot Diaz was hailed as a rising star when he published “Drown,” a short story collection, in 1996. Now, more than a decade later, Diaz has written his first novel, “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.” Bob talks with Diaz about the new book, his decade of literary silence and the special pressures that come with being identified as the voice of a people.

 

Johnny Pacheco is a living legend of Latin music. In 1963, Pacheco co-founded Fania records, which gave a home to Latin musicians and singers that would go on to gain world stardom. The film, ‘El Cantante’ starring Marc Anthony and Jennifer Lopez is a biopic of the Puerto Rican singer Hector Lavoe. Johnny Pacheco talks with Bob about his career, Fania Records and the late Hector Lavoe.

 

Monday, September 17, 2007

Bob talks politics with regular Monday guest David Broder of The Washington Post. Then, Bob talks with MacArthur Genius grant recipient George Saunders about his first book of non-fiction essays. The collection is called The Braindead Megaphone and Saunders has some not so nice things to say about the current state of the news media.

 

Tuesday, September 18, 2007

Bob talks to award winning documentarians Ken Burns and Lynn Novick about their upcoming feature The War. The War is a seven-part series directed and produced by Burns and Novick debuting on PBS September 23, 2007. It tells the story of the Second World War through the personal accounts of men and women from four American towns.

 

Wednesday, September 19, 2007

Bob talks with Senator Christopher Dodd (D-Connecticut) about his book Letters from Nuremberg. Senator Dodd uncovered a cache of family letters that his father Thomas Dodd wrote his mother in 1945-46. Thomas served as a staff lawyer during the Nuremberg trials and quickly rose to prominence for his interrogation of Hermann Goring, Alfred Rosenberg, and other Nazi war criminals. Then, screenwriter and director Paul Haggis earned two Oscars for the 2005 hit movie Crash . His screenplay for Million Dollar Baby was Oscar nominated for best adapted screenplay. Bob talks to Haggis about writing for the big screen and his latest creation, “In the Valley of Elah,” which is based on the true story of military veterans returning from Iraq.

 

Thursday, September 20, 2007

Bob talks to Garrison Keillor about his new book, Pontoon: A Novel of Lake Wobegone. Then, Bob talks director Julie Taymor about her latest film “Across the Universe.” Taymor, who won a Tony for “The Lion King” and an Oscar for “Frida,” has created a very different type of movie musical centered around the volatile events of America’s 1960s, set to the music of The Beatles.

 

Friday, September 21, 2007

Bob talks with Greg Garrett about his book, The Gospel according to Hollywood . In his book, Garrett analyzes dozens of films and extracts their religious and spiritual themes.

 

Saturday/Sunday, September 22-23, 2007

 Bob talks to award winning filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick about their upcoming documentary titled “The War.” The seven-part series directed and produced by Burns and Novick premieres this weekend on PBS. The project tells the story of the Second World War through the personal accounts of men and women from four American towns.

 

Bob talks to public radio treasure and host of “A Prairie Home Companion” Garrison Keillor about his latest novel set in Lake Wobegone. The book is called Pontoon and it’s published by Viking.

 

Bob talks with writer and 2006 MacArthur Genius grant recipient George Saunders about his first book of non-fiction essays. The collection is called The Braindead Megaphone and Saunders has some not so nice things to say about the current state of the news media. He also tells us about his time along the US-Mexican border and about staying in the world’s only 7-star hotel in Dubai.

 

Monday, September 24, 2007

Bob talks politics with regular Monday guest David Broder of The Washington Post. Then Bob talks with Rebecca Roberts, one of the new hosts on the new XM Channel, POTUS 08. And finally, Bob talks to Frank Rich about the public relations strategies of the Bush Administration, the departure of Karl Rove who controlled much of that White House PR, and the spin of the upcoming presidential candidates. Rich is the author of The Greatest Story Ever Sold.


Tuesday, September 25, 2007

Bob talks to Anne Lewis about her film “Morristown,” described as a working class response to globalization. It engages the audience in the issues of immigration, factory flight, and the organized demand for economic justice. Then Bob talks to producer Jack Wright about his collection of coal mining songs called ‘Music of Coal,’  it is available at www.MusicOfCoal.com


Wednesday , September 26, 2007

Bob talks to former Democratic Presidential candidate Wesley Clark about his 34 years in the Army, his role as a four-star general as NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander during the war in Yugoslavia, and his plans for the future. His most recent book is, A Time to Lead: For Duty, Honor and Country . Then, Bob talks with journalist and author John Anderson about his latest book. Follow the Money: How George W. Bush and the Texas Republicans Hog-Tied America.


Thursday, September 27, 2007

Rarely does the public get a glimpse inside the United States Supreme Court. However, Jeffrey Toobin was granted access to interviews and insiders of the nation’s highest court. He explains to Bob the politics and cliques that dominate many of the supreme decisions. His most recent book is The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court . Then, for the past two years, former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno has been working on a collection of songs that tell the history of America back to 1492. The 50-song set includes 50 different musicians including John Mellencamp, The Blind Boys of Alabama, Martha Wainwright, and Andrew Bird.

 

Friday, September 28, 2007

Four time Grammy winner Lyle Lovett talks with Bob about his life as a musician and what’s changed over the years.  Although considered a country musican by some, Lovett’s sound blends together blues, gospel, jazz and folk with a country sensibility.  His latest album is titled “It’s Not Big It’s Large.”  Then, Bob talks to Academy Award winner Robert Benton about the art and science of directing great actors.  he’s directed Dustin Hoffman, Meryl Streep, Sally Fields and many more over the years.  Most recently he directed Morgan Freeman and Greg Kinear in “Feast of Love.”

 

Saturday/Sunday, September 29-30, 2007

 Bob talks to former Democratic Presidential candidate Wesley Clark about his 34 years in the Army, his role as a four-star general as NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander during the war in Yugoslavia, and his plans for the future. His most recent book is, A Time to Lead: For Duty, Honor and Country.

 

Screenwriter and director Paul Haggis earned two Oscars for the 2005 hit movie “Crash.” His screenplay for “Million Dollar Baby” was Oscar nominated for best adapted screenplay. Bob talks to Haggis about writing for the big screen and his latest creation, “In the Valley of Elah,” which is based on the true story of military veterans returning from Iraq.

 

Four time Grammy winner Lyle Lovett talks with Bob about his life as a musician and what’s changed over the years. Although considered by some a country musician, Lovett’s sound blends together blues, gospel, jazz, and folk with a country sensibility. His latest album is titled: “It’s Not Big It’s Large.”

 

For the hour, we’ll talk candidly about “The L Word” and the state of Liberalism in America today. We begin with Cheryl Reed, the newly appointed editorial page editor for the Chicago Sun-Times. Next, a discussion of economic policy with Dean Baker of the Center for Economic and Policy Research. Then Peter Beinart talks about national security and his book: “The Good Fight: Why Liberals—And Only Liberals—Can Win the War on Terror and Make America Great Again.” Then we’ll combine religion and politics with Reverend John Buehrens. And we finish on a lighter note with unapologetic liberal and Washington Post humor columnist Gene Weingarten.