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Friday
Aug212015

The Bob Edwards Show (August 24-28)

Monday, August 24, 2015: This week, we present another round of some of our favorite musical performance chats from the past decade. Today, Bob talks with Reggie Pace and Lance Koehler about founding their band called No BS Brass!  With four trombones, three trumpets, a sax, a tuba and drums, the band can really make some noise. They’ve been rocking fans in the Richmond, Virginia area for years, now the band is hoping to introduce its sound to the rest of the country. They will start by blowing the windows out of our performance studio.  Then, Bob sits down with 12 members of the Austin-based classical collective Mother Falcon for a private concert in our performance studio.  They’ll play a few songs from their “orchestral rock” album titled You Knew and discuss the unique challenges that face such a large band when on tour.

Tuesday, August 25, 2015: We continue our series of musical performance chats with Lily and Madeleine Jurkiewicz.  The Indiana sisters join Bob in our performance studio to discuss the beginning of their music career and to play a few songs from their self-titled album Lily & Madeleine. Then Bob sits down for a performance chat with musician Chad Lawson.  He’s an award-winning pianist and his latest CD is titled The Chopin Variations.  They discuss what it’s like to be an independent artist trying to make a career in today’s music world.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015: All this week, we’re presenting some of our favorite musical performance chats from the past decade. Singer-songwriter David Wilcox has been characterized as a cross between musicians James Taylor and Nick Drake. Although his music does have a quiet, acoustic feel, its tone and message are unique to this guitarist. His album Airstream was written over two years as Wilcox, his wife, and their son traveled across America touring. He plays selections from the records and talks with Bob about his career in music. Then, Bob talks with Jimmy Carter and other members of The Blind Boys of Alabama about the Grammy-winning gospel group’s album called I’ll Find a Way. It was produced by Justin Vernon of the indie folk group Bon Iver and features guest appearances by a new generation of fans of the Blind Boys.

Thursday, August 27, 2015: We continue our series of some of our favorite musical performance chats. Today, singer-songwriter Josh Ritter talks with Bob and performs a few songs from his CD, The Historical Conquests of Josh Ritter. Then, Patty Larkin joins Bob in the performance studio to play songs from her latest album Still Green.  Her 13th recording, much of the album was written in a primitive shack on the remote dunes of Cape Cod.   You can hear Larkin playing no less than seven instruments on the album —- acoustic and electric guitars, mandolin, bass, slide guitar, keyboards and kalimba.   

Friday, August 28, 2015: Today we conclude our week-long series of musical performance chats. For more than 50 years, the male choral group Ladysmith Black Mambazo has kept alive the traditional sounds of their home land.  These three-time Grammy winners were South Africa’s first black musicians to receive gold record status.  They crowd into our performance studio to sing a few traditional childhood tunes from their album called Songs from a Zulu Farm. Then, Sweet Honey in the Rock, the internationally renowned all-female vocal ensemble, brings its powerhouse sound to our performance studio for a conversation with Bob and to share a few of their songs.  The Grammy award-winning group was founded in 1973 and took their name from Psalm 81:16. 

Friday
Aug212015

Bob Edwards Weekend (August 22-23, 2015)

HOUR ONE:

Capital punishment is a controversial topic. The death penalty is debated…death row inmates are sometimes granted clemency…sometimes, new evidence clears them completely. But there is another, quieter death penalty being served right now by roughly 50,000 American prisoners. They are inmates who have been sentenced to “life without parole” – who are destined to live the rest of their lives behind bars. They know that they won’t leave until they die. Bob talks with husband and wife filmmakers Alan and Susan Raymond about their brand new documentary on the subject called Toe Tag Parole.

 

HOUR TWO:

Bob talks with former astronaut Chris Hadfield about a few of his 4,000 hours spent in space, and about his book An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything.  While on his mission aboard the International Space Station, Hadfield attracted the world’s attention when he released a series of photos and educational videos about life in space. His version of David Bowie’s Space Oddity received over 10 million views in its first three days online.

Then – we’ll remember our trip down to Cape Canaveral to witness a night launch of the Space Shuttle Endeavour. Bob talks with public radio’s resident expert on NASA and the space program, Pat Duggins. He’s written several books on the subject, including Final Countdown which deals with the end of the Shuttle program.

 

Friday
Aug142015

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (August 17-21, 2015)

Monday, August 17, 2015: One of the most legendary moments in rock-n-roll history started with an ad placed in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal:  “Young men with unlimited capital looking for interesting, legitimate investment opportunities and business propositions.”   That “Aquarian Exposition” took place 46 years ago this weekend.  Greg Walter worked on the backstage crew of Woodstock and came away with more than his share of stories, which he includes in Woodstock: A New Look - along with photographs he shot during the festival.

Tuesday, August 18, 2015: A trustee of the Natural Resources Defense Council since 1974, Robert Redford has dedicated nearly as much of his life to the environment as he has to filmmaking.  Redford joined Bob on stage at the Lincoln Center in front of a live audience in 2009 to talk about his film career, his support for young artists, the many NRDC campaigns he has supported in the past – and why that work will still be needed for years to come. Today is Redford’s 79th birthday.

Wednesday, August 19, 2015: In the UK it was published as Alex’s Adventures in Numberland.  The US version has a cleverly improved title, Here’s Looking at Euclid.  Whatever the title, Alex Bellos has managed to write a best-selling book all about math. Bellos traveled around the world interviewing people whose lives are connected to math.  Bellos’ ambition is to prove to a wider audience - starting with Bob - that “the world of math is a remarkable place.”

Thursday, August 20, 2015: Clay Johnson is the founder of Blue State Digital which built and managed Barack Obama’s online presidential campaign.  Now Johnson says we not only suffer from information overload, but we have lost the ability to filter the average eleven hours of data we ingest every day.  He describes the problem and offers some advice in his book titled, The Information Diet: a Case for Conscious Consumption. Then Ronald Bishop explores our society’s obsession with triviality, extravagance and spectacle in his book, More: The Vanishing of Scale in an Over-the-Top Nation.

Friday, August 21, 2015: Bob talks with former astronaut Chris Hadfield about a few of his 4,000 hours spent in space, and about his book An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything.  While on his mission aboard the International Space Station, Hadfield attracted the world’s attention when he released a series of photos and educational videos about life in space. His version of David Bowie’s Space Oddity received over 10 million views in its first three days online.  Then – we’ll remember our trip down to Cape Canaveral to witness a night launch of the Space Shuttle Endeavour. Bob talks with public radio’s resident expert on the NASA and the space program, Pat Duggins. He’s written several books on the subject, including The Final Countdown which deals with the end of the Shuttle program.

Friday
Aug142015

Bob Edwards Weekend (August 15-16, 2015)

 

HOUR ONE:

One of the most legendary moments in rock-n-roll history started with an ad placed in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal:  “Young men with unlimited capital looking for interesting, legitimate investment opportunities and business propositions.”   That “Aquarian Exposition” took place 46 years ago this weekend.  Greg Walter worked on the backstage crew of Woodstock and came away with more than his share of stories, which he includes in Woodstock: A New Look - along with photographs he shot during the festival.

 

HOUR TWO:

In 1939, this was the opening weekend for a bold new film.  Bob talks with historian John Fricke about the cast and history of the American classic The Wizard of Oz.

Then, we’ll help celebrate the 70th birthday of Steve Martin. The actor, comedian, writer, musician and all around Renaissance man returned to the banjo on his second album Rare Bird Alert.  Martin is joined on the CD by the bluegrass group The Steep Canyon Rangers, with special guests The Dixie Chicks and Paul McCartney singing a couple of Martin’s original tunes.

Friday
Aug072015

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (August 10-14, 2015)

Monday, August 10, 2015: Rolling Stone contributing editor Anthony DeCurtis has appeared on this program every year since 2005.  For five years, he was our regular music reviewer.  And every year, he comes back at Christmas time to review his favorite songs and albums of the past 12 months. In 2005, he talked to Bob about his book titled In Other Words: Artists Talk About Life and Work. It was a collection of his own writings and interviews with some of rock and roll’s biggest stars.  Then Bob talks with DeCurtis about a later book.  Blues and Chaos is a collection of pieces written by legendary music critic Robert Palmer.  The articles, which appeared originally in Rolling Stone and the New York Times, were arranged thematically and edited by DeCurtis.

Tuesday, August 11, 2015: There’s an old adage that only two things in life are certain: taxes and death. But modern medicine has made the latter less certain. These days, dead people can live for a long time on life support. For instance, stroke victims are regularly kept alive long enough to donate their organs, and brain-dead pregnant women are sometimes kept alive long enough to deliver their babies. Dick Teresi details the long, complicated history of the changing definition of death in his book, The Undead: Organ Harvesting, the Ice-Water Test, Beating-Heart Cadavers – How Medicine Is Blurring the Line Between Life and Death.

Wednesday, August 12, 2015: Bob talks to Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, Ron Suskind, and his wife, Cornelia Kennedy, about the challenges of raising their autistic son, as detailed in Suskind’s book titled Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes and Autism.  Just before his third birthday, their chatty, cheerful son suddenly stopped talking or making eye contact.  He eventually re-learned how to express himself by watching, memorizing, and impersonating characters from Disney animated films. Then a different look at Disney. Director Don Hahn and producer Peter Schneider discuss their documentary Waking Sleeping Beauty. It’s a behind-the-scenes view into the turf battle at the Disney studios between the old animators and new innovators as the studios made the difficult transition from the bleak 1980s to its glory days following the success of The Little Mermaid.

Thursday, August 13, 2015: Berlin was divided on this date in 1961.  Two days later, work began on The Berlin Wall, the famous symbol of division between East and West … The Iron Curtain.  Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck is the director and screenwriter of the political thriller, The Lives of Others. The Oscar-winning film begins in East Berlin in 1984, ends in 1991 and focuses on the Stasi, the German Democratic Republic’s vast network of informers that at one time numbered 200,000 people. Then an earlier chapter in Berlin’s history. The Berlin Airlift has been called the first battle of the cold war. For almost a year, young men flew old planes over Berlin dropping food, fuel, medicine — even candy — to the two million people below. In his book Daring Young Men, historian Richard Reeves tells the stories of the civilian airmen who carried out one of history’s largest humanitarian campaigns. 

Friday, August 14, 2015: In 1939, this was the opening weekend for a bold new film.  Bob talks with historian John Fricke about the cast and history of the American classic The Wizard of Oz. Then, we’ll help celebrate the 70th birthday of Steve Martin. The actor, comedian, writer, musician and all around Renaissance man returned to the banjo on his second album Rare Bird Alert.  Martin is joined on the CD by bluegrass group The Steep Canyon Rangers, with special guests The Dixie Chicks and Paul McCartney singing a couple of Martin’s original tunes.