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Bob Edwards Weekend - November 2013

November 2-3

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Sheri Fink holds an MD and PhD in neuroscience, and she has reported on health, medicine and science from every continent except Antarctica. Five Days at Memorial is her new book chronicling the events at Memorial Medical Center in New Orleans during hurricane Katrina in August of 2005.  The hospital is situated three feet below sea level and when the storm hit, at least two thousand people were at Memorial. Two hundred and forty of those were patients, six hundred were workers and the rest were seeking refuge from the storm. The scene quickly became chaotic and Fink reports that several doctors and nurses were faced with making an unthinkable decision: deliberately injecting some ill patients with drugs to hasten their deaths, resulting in at least 18 fatalities.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

HOUR TWO:

Mary Louise Kelly has spent the last two decades as a producer, host and correspondent for NPR and the BBC.  In 2004, she launched NPR’s intelligence beat, which covered wars and terrorism.  Now she has drawn on all of that real-world knowledge to write her own debut novel, a spy thriller titled Anonymous Sources.

Bridget Jones is back.  In Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy, readers learn that the star of two best-selling books and two hit movies is now a mother of two and even more shockingly, a widow. Author Helen Fielding joins Bob to discuss her most famous creation, and what’s next for her character Bridget.

 

November 9-10

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Then Bob talks with former astronaut Chris Hadfield about a few of his 4,000 hours spent in space, and about his new book An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything.  Earlier this year while aboard the International Space Station, Hadfield attracted the world’s attention when he released a series of photos and educational videos about life in space. His version of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity,” received over 10 million views in its first three days online.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

HOUR TWO:

Bob talks with poet, performance artist and author Carlos Andrés Gómez about his desire to deconstruct the notion of masculinity. The new paperback version of his book is titled Man Up: Reimagining Modern Manhood.

Stanley Jordan possesses a generous soul, a brilliant mind, and two of the most skilled hands to ever touch a guitar.  For the last thirty years, the Princeton graduate has toured the world, thrilling crowds at every stop.  In addition to writing original compositions, Jordan is known for his innovative arrangements of pop tunes, often performing on two guitars at once, or with one hand playing guitar and the other piano, switching when necessary.  Five years ago, he wowed Bob with songs from his album, State of Nature, and now he’s back with a new release, Friends, featuring collaborations with Regina Carter, Bucky Pizzarelli and Christian McBride among others. 

 

November 16-17

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Award-winning director Alex Gibney returns to discuss his latest documentary.  Since the story changed so drastically from the time he began the project, Gibney has been working on this one, then re-working it, for years now. The Armstrong Lie explores the rise AND fall of cancer survivor and 7-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong. Gibney set out to chronicle Armstrong’s 2009 comeback at the world’s most famous cycling race but instead he captured an insider’s view as a racing legend collapsed.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

HOUR TWO: 

This week, 3 journalists from a now defunct Rupert Murdoch tabloid plead guilty to phone hacking charges.  The scandal had the potential to end the media tycoon, but Murdoch survived and continues to rule a global, multimedia empire.  NPR’s media correspondent David Folkenflik takes an in-depth look into the mogul’s life, business and scandals with his new book, Murdoch’s World: The Last of the Old Media Empires.

Brothers David and Joe Henry examine the life of comedian Richard Pryor in their book Furious Cool: Richard Pryor and the World That Made Him.

 

November 23-24

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

As a new American citizen, historian and best-selling author Simon Winchester burrowed into his adopted country’s history of unity for his new book The Men Who United the States: America’s Explorers, Inventors, Eccentrics, and Mavericks, and the Creation of One Nation, Indivisible.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

HOUR TWO:

Writer Stephan Talty’s new book, The Secret Agent: In Search of America’s Greatest World War II Spy, tells the story of wealthy oil man Eric Erickson, who spied against the Nazis, won the Medal of Freedom, and ultimately saved thousands of Allied lives.

Former Poet Laureate Billy Collins is out with his first volume of new and selected poetry in twelve years.  Aimless Love includes fifty new poems that touch on themes of love, loss, joy and poetry itself.

 

November 30-December 1

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Born Edward Kennedy Ellington in 1899, the young man who would become the greatest jazz composer of the 20th century acquired the name “Duke” because he had a “princely” manner of dress and attitude.   Terry Teachout, drama critic of The Wall Street Journal, traces Ellington’s complex life story and his music in the new biography Duke.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

HOUR TWO:

Ann Patchett is a best-selling novelist and the owner of an independent book store in Nashville.  All she’s ever wanted to do with her life is get paid to write fiction, but early in her career, that wasn’t a recipe for financial stability.  Instead, she wrote essays. Lots and lots of essays. They appeared in a range of publications from The Atlantic to Outside, and her new book, This is the Story of a Happy Marriage, collects twenty-two of them. Taken together, the essays chronicle her path from a struggling young artist to a confident writer.