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Bob Edwards Weekend - May 2013

May 4-5

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

NPR’s Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me host Peter Sagal set out across America on a motorcycle to find out what we as citizens of this nation know – and how we feel – about our Constitution for the new PBS series Constitution USA with Peter Sagal

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

HOUR TWO:

Actor Dennis Quaid joins director Ramin Bahrani to discuss the new film At Any Price.  Quaid stars as Henry Whipple who risks friends and family to meet the highly competitive demands of modern day farming.

Since Quincy Jones discovered him fifty years ago, Grammy-winning pianist Bob James had forged a diverse and successful career in music. Fans of 1970s television will remember the theme to Taxi, a Bob James composition actually titled Angela. One group who clearly appreciated James’ music was the seminal rap trio Run DMC who sampled his cover of Paul Simon’s Take Me to the Mardi Gras, introducing James to a whole new generation of fans. In 1990, James began a group called Fourplay, which now has recorded a dozen albums. Their latest is titled “Esprit De Four” and the band will tour throughout the spring.

 

May 11-12

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Margaret Fuller was one of the literary elite of 19th Century New England, along with Thoreau and Emerson.  But many of the details of her remarkable life have been eclipsed by her tragic death in a shipwreck off the coast of Fire Island. A new biography, Margaret Fuller: A New American Life, by Megan Marshall, tells her story from youth in New England to adulthood in New York and Europe.  Fuller was a literary editor, a columnist crusading on behalf of the poor and a war correspondent. 

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

HOUR TWO:

Kids tend to get squirmy after too long in church, but when your mother is the preacher, the phrase “Be Good” carries a lot of weight. That’s the name of Gregory Porter’s latest release, a soulful jazz record heavily influenced by gospel & blues. Porter developed his love for music in his mother’s church and now his recording career is on the rise, as evidenced by the two Grammy nominations earned from his first two albums.

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine returned to her earliest musical memories by recording 25 lullabies for her new album Violin Lullabies.  Digging deep into classical music and traditional folk tunes, Barton Pine’s collection reminds us of familiar tunes as well as introducing listeners to previously unrecorded lullabies written by lesser known composers. 

 

May 18-19

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Paul Theroux has made a career of going on the road.  He travels light, and frequently, and he’s written scores of books about the places he’s visited.  His latest is about a continent that first received him as a 22-year-old Peace Corps volunteer: Africa.  The Last Train to Zona Verde details the people and places Theroux encountered from South Africa to Angola.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe

HOUR TWO:

British musician Billy Bragg is known for his folk-punk albums that run the gamut from protest to love songs.  He returns to chat with Bob about his latest release, Tooth & Nail, and about the loss of one of his great sources of inspiration, Margaret Thatcher.

Life After Life is Jill McCorkle’s first novel in seventeen years. It deals with the daily life of the residents and staff of Pine Haven Estates, a retirement facility that many of Fulton, North Carolina’s elderly now call home. McCorkle calls her story “a love song to memory and life.”

 

May 25-26

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

During World War II, someone had to save the art and antiquities of Europe from Allied bombing and from occupying then retreating Nazi forces.  The painting of The Last Supper and Michelangelo’s sculpture of David were just two priceless works that were almost destroyed.  Bob talks with writer and World War II specialist Robert Edsel about the important work and the people who risked their lives for art.  Edsel’s new book is Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation’s Treasures from the Nazis.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

HOUR TWO:

Buzz Aldrin was the second man to step foot on the moon and the first to punch an Apollo conspiracy theorist in the face after the man demanded Aldrin swear on a Bible that the Moon landings were not faked.  Aldrin dedicated a chapter to the incident in his 2009 autobiography Magnificent Desolation, which takes its title from the first words he uttered while walking on the moon.   Now Aldrin has authored a new book from National Geographic in which he lays out his goals for the space program and how he believes we can get humans to Mars and back safely. It’s titled Mission to Mars: My Vision for Space Exploration.

Award-winning travel writer and historian William Dalrymple looks back to an earlier time when a Western power invaded Afghanistan.  Dalrymple’s new book is titled The Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan: 1839-42.