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Bob Edwards Weekend - May 2012

May 5-6

HOUR ONE:

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

As an ex-felon, writer Jack Gantos might have seemed like an odd choice to win this year’s Newbery Medal, the most prestigious award in children’s literature.   But Gantos has been writing acclaimed books for young people for years, including his popular Joey Pigza series.  His most recent novel Dead End in Norvelt was awarded the 2012 Newbery Medal and the 2012 Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction.

Then, in this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of Jeana Lee Tahnk.  Parents are one of the biggest markets for the publishing industry.  You could fill a bookstore with all the manuals addressing everything from thumbsucking to bedwetting to discipline.  And many of the authors offer contradictory advice.  It’s hard for modern parents to feel they’re raising their kids the “right” way.  Tahnk thinks of herself as the CEO of her household, but she also has a career outside the home.  She says the decisions she makes at home are always with the best interests of her children in mind.

HOUR TWO:

At a dinner party a few years ago, a rich lawyer asked, “I mean YOUR’RE a teacher, Taylor. Be honest. What do you make?”  Taylor Mali took offense and since then has been on the offensive, defending the role and the profession of teachers.  His poem “What Teachers Make” has been viewed more than five million times on Youtube and now Mali has a book by the same name.

Actor Benedict Cumberbatch returns to the small screen as the world’s greatest detective, the brilliant yet sometimes irritating Sherlock Holmes.  After last year’s hit first season, Masterpiece Mystery’s Sherlock picks up with a contemporary Holmes and Watson battling evil mastermind Jim Moriarty.  The series is co-created and written by Steven Moffat.

 

May 12-13

HOUR ONE:

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

For a relatively young country, Israel and its supporters wield immense power in shaping United States government policy. Peter Beinart is a former editor of the New Republic who lays out his criticism of the Jewish State in a new book called The Crisis of Zionism. Among Beinart’s more controversial ideas is a proposed boycott on products made in Israeli settlements.

Then, in this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of Lauren LeBlanc.  Americans like to dream big – for the country, and themselves.  Teenagers imagine a future for that includes throngs of adoring fans, and photographers tracking their every move.  LeBlanc was no different, but life hasn’t worked out that way.  Instead, she’s a mother of two, living in the suburbs.  Her life is simple, and she couldn’t be happier.  LeBlanc says that she may never make an impact outside her community, but that’s okay because inside her home, she is irreplaceable.

HOUR TWO:

Studs Terkel was a noted writer, broadcaster, oral historian and story teller.  He died in 2008, but shared several lengthy conversations with Bob.  We honor Terkel’s centenary by re-airing portions of their chats.  Terkel was born on May 16, 1912.

For his latest album, singer-songwriter Loudon Wainwright reflects on his life … this time on the sunny topics of aging, decline and demise. He also brings in his family to help: all of his kids and most of his ex-wives appear on the album. Wainwright joins Bob in the studio to perform a few songs and to talk about his CD titled Older Than My Old Man Now.

 

May 19-20

HOUR ONE:
 

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Christopher Buckley is back with a new book, this time a fictional novel about U.S.-China relations.  In They Eat Puppies, Don’t They, a Washington lobbyist teams up with a neocon to turn the American public against the Chinese.  Buckley discusses the novel, how his famous father influenced him and his writing and how to determine fact from fiction in our capitol city.

Then, in this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of Jessica Paris.  Summer is fast approaching – the season of taking it easy.  Paris says we should just say no to those impulses.  She is not a puritan or a miser, but in a world of bounty, choices have to be made.  And Paris believes that sometimes deprivation leads to greater satisfaction than indulgence.

HOUR TWO:

Try to imagine what would happen if Middle Eastern women were able to take control of their religious conflicts. That’s what writer, director and lead actress Nadine Labaki has done in her new film, Where Do We Go Now, and the result is poignant and witty.  Labaki will discuss the film, and the new promises and perils facing the Arab world.

 

May 26-27

HOUR ONE:

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

For nearly fifty years, Frank Deford has been dissecting the sports world and interviewing some of the most famous and important athletes and coaches around.  He has covered just about every sport, in every medium, and he has written about it all in his new memoir, Over Time: My Life as a Sportswriter.

Then, in this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of Michael Seifert.  We know that powerful people influence politics.  By comparison, it’s sometimes hard to believe that ordinary citizens with modest means can make a difference.  But inside the voting booth, everyone is equal.  Seifert is a Catholic priest from Cameron Park, Texas – the poorest place in America, according to the 2000 Census.  The rate of civic participation matched the economic description.  But, Seifert encouraged his neighbors to vote, and their actions resulted in more attention from local politicians, and better quality of life for the townspeople.

HOUR TWO:

Diana Henriques wrote the definitive book on Bernie Madoff, based on unprecedented access and interviews with more than a hundred people at all levels of involvement with the crime. The Wizard of Lies: Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust is now out in paperback.

Singer-songwriter Paul Thorn’s latest album is called What the Hell is Goin’ On?  It’s a collection of songs by other writers that Thorn admires but who tell the same kind of straight-up, down-home stories that the always-entertaining Tupelo native is known for.