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Bob Edwards Weekend - March 2014

March 1-2
 
HOUR ONE:
 
Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.
 
New Yorker staff writer George Packer profiles the mystique and power of Amazon in his article “Cheap Words.” Packers admits that Amazon is good for customers, but asks the basic question “is Amazon good for books?”  His article appears in the latest issue ofThe New Yorker.
  
HOUR TWO:
 
The 86th annual Academy Awards will be handed out on March 2nd.  Bob talks with Washington Post film critic Ann Hornaday for a preview of the Oscar race. 
 
Bob talks with Philomena Lee, whose story inspired the Oscar-nominated movie “Philomena” starring Judi Dench and Steve Coogan.  Lee is an 80-year-old Irish woman who spent decades searching for the young son she was forced to give up when she was an unwed teenager.  The Catholic nuns caring for Lee in the 1950s took the boy who was adopted by a couple living in the United States – a common practice in Ireland at the time. The convent then refused to help Philomena re-connect with her son.  She only found him with the help of a BBC journalist. Lee is joined by her daughter Jane Libberton for this interview.
 
 
March 8-9
 

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Then we’ll examine the political turmoil in Ukraine. Bob talks with Miroslava Gongadze, an anchor and reporter at Voice of America’s Ukrainian Service, and Mychailo Wynnyckyi, a professor of sociology at the National University in Kiev.  The trouble started three months ago when a small group of students met on Kiev’s Independence Square to mark the anniversary of Ukraine’s 2004 Orange Revolution.  It quickly morphed into a massive popular uprising. Bloody clashes between protesters and police left about 100 people dead. It led to the sudden departure of President Viktor Yanukovych, and Russian President Vladimir Putin’s decision to send in troops to the Ukrainian territory of Crimea. Now Ukraine is an international crisis.

A 2004 research study concluded that child care ranked sixteenth out of nineteen activities that gave working women the most pleasure. Housework beat out parenting.  In the last few decades, there have been hundreds of ways that the experience of parenting has changed.  Jennifer Senior writes about them in a new book, All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood.

HOUR TWO:

Even though writer Carl Hiaasen is a best-selling novelist, he has never given up his day job as a columnist for the Miami Herald.  His new book, Dance of the Reptiles, is a compilation of some of his best pieces, on topics ranging from the serious to the ridiculous.

Bob speaks with Rosanne Cash about her first new album in four years, The River & The Thread. The record was inspired by her trips to Dyess, Arkansas about two years ago to participate in the restoration of her father’s boyhood home.   

 

March 15-16

 

HOUR ONE:

 
Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.
 
Laura Lippman wrote her first seven books while working fulltime as a reporter for The Baltimore Sun.  She left journalism in 2001, but kept a deadline driven writing style, publishing a book nearly every year. The latest, After I’m Gone, revolves around a cold case investigation into the disappearance of Felix Brewer.
 
Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe
  
HOUR TWO:
 
Bob talks to Mary Willingham, a former learning specialist who worked with athletes at the University of North Carolina, and UNC history professor Jay Smith, about the continuing controversy around the university’s big money sports programs. Willingham says that some of the football and basketball players at Carolina she tutored or evaluated were reading between a 4th grade and 8th grade level, and a that a handful were functionally illiterate. She said one of the Tar Heels’ basketball players she tutored couldn’t read at all. UNC officials demoted her. She has also received death threats from fans. Willingham and professor Jay Smith are writing a book about the scandal, and the university’s reaction.
 
Bob talks with Jason Bateman about his new movie, Bad Words. Bateman stars as 40-year-old spelling bee contestant Guy Trilby. He also directed the film.
 

 

March 22-23 

HOUR ONE:
 
Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.
 
As Kermit the Frog, Miss Piggy, and the rest of Muppet crew return to the big screen this weekend in Muppets Most Wanted, we look at the life of their creator, visionary artist Jim Henson.  In his book, Jim Henson: The Biography, writer Brian Jay Jones tells Henson’s personal story, revealing the man behind the Muppets.
 
HOUR TWO:
  
Bob talks to Dave Zirin, host of SiriusXM’s weekly show “Edge of Sports” about scandals in college sports.  The most recent controversy involves the University of North Carolina.  Zirin helps us step back from that specific story to look at systemic problems plaguing the NCAA.
 
Bob talks with sports writer John Feinstein about his book Where Nobody Knows Your Name: Life in the Minor Leagues of Baseball. Feinstein focuses on six players, two managers and un umpire to paint a portrait of Triple A baseball.
 
 
March 29-30
   
HOUR ONE:
  
Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.
 
Two weeks after a Queens woman named Catherine “Kitty” Genovese was brutally murdered, the New York Times published a detailed account of what happened: For more than half an hour 38 respectable, law-abiding citizens in Queens watched a killer stalk and stab a woman in three separate attacks in Kew Gardens….Not one person telephoned the police during the assault; one witness called after the woman was dead.” It turns out many of those facts were wrong.  Fifty years later, Kevin Cook takes a closer look at the details of the case in a book titled Kitty Genovese: The Murder, the Bystanders, the Crime That Changed America.
 
Paul Schomer of Radiocrowdfund.com is back to share some new music discoveries with us.  This time he’ll play tracks by Boone Graham, Not in the Face, Shortsleeves, Adrienne Lenker and Grand Lake Islands. 
 
HOUR TWO:
 
Bob talks to former NBA star Len Elmore about the business of college sports, and how it’s changed since he was a student. Elmore graduated from the University of Maryland in 1974, where he was a three-time all-conference player, then spent a decade in the NBA. After his basketball career ended, he went to Harvard Law School and worked as a prosecutor. Elmore says college players are bigger, stronger and train so much harder than he did. He thinks the whole system of college sports is out of balance, with players earning millions of dollars for the coaches and schools, while their athletic scholarships don’t even cover the full cost of education.
 
John Wooden was by far the most successful college basketball coach ever. “The Wizard of Westwood” led his UCLA Bruins to ten NCAA Basketball Division 1 championships, more than twice as many as any other coach. In addition to his unquestionable on-court success, he also imbued his players, including Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Bill Walton, with indelible life lessons for success. Seth Davis, senior writer for Sports Illustrated and analyst for CBS Sports, is the author of Wooden: A Coach’s Life.