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Bob Edwads Weekend - March 2013

March 2-3

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for The Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Jim and Jamie Dutcher lived with a pack of wolves for six years, studying and documenting their social behavior, producing three Emmy Award-winning documentaries and writing four books about the Sawtooth Pack.  Their latest is published by National Geographic and titled The Hidden Life of Wolves. It documents the couple’s work as they’ve tried to dispel the myths about wolves and explain why they are so important to the health of ecosystems.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

HOUR TWO:

Bob talks with best-selling writer Susan Cain about the strengths and weaknesses of introversion.  She’s the author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking. It’s now available in paperback. 

Martha Redbone joins Bob in the performance studio for a chat about her album of Appalachian folk songs set to the poetry of William Blake. The CD is titled The Garden of Love.

 

March 9-10

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for The Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.
 
There is no shortage of food in the United States, yet every day 49 million Americans – including one in four children – go hungry.  A new documentary called A Place at the Table examines the issue of first world hunger through the lens of three people: Rose, a second-grader in Colorado who often relies on friends and neighbors to feed her; Tremonica, a fifth-grader in Mississippi whose health is compromised by her empty calorie diet; and Barbie, a single mom in Philadelphia trying to make ends meet for her two kids.  Filmmakers Lori Silverbush and Kristi Jacobson, along with celebrity chef Tom Colicchio, talk with Bob about the film, the accompanying book of essays of the same name, and efforts to end hunger in the richest country in the world.
 
Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.
 
HOUR TWO:

Peter Ames Carlin has written well-regarded and exhaustively researched biographies on Paul McCartney and Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys. Now he’s turned his journalistic eye to Bruce Springsteen with his newest title, Bruce. Carlin joins Bob to talk about rock-n-roll’s working class hero known as “The Boss.”

Bob Edwards Weekend airs on Sirius XM Public Radio (XM 121, Sirius 205) Saturdays from 8-10 AM EST.

 

 

March 16-17
 
HOUR ONE:
 
Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for The Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.
 
George Saunders is a bestselling writer of short fiction, essays, novellas and children’s books.  The New York Times Magazine called his newest collection, Tenth of December, “The best book you’ll read this year.”  Bob talks to Saunders about that book and his writing process.
 
Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.  This week we hear about sportsmanship from high school student Josh Stein.
  
HOUR TWO:
 
Jody Williams received the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize for her work to ban landmines.  She joins Bob to discuss her life as chronicled in her book titled My Name is Jody Williams: A Vermont Girl’s Winding Path to the Nobel Peace Prize.
 
Shelby Smoak was born with hemophilia, an inherited genetic disease that prevents blood from clotting.  Smoak was a teenager dealing with the realities of his disease when he learned he was also HIV-positive, thanks to a tainted blood transfusion he received in the 1980s. In Bleeder: A Memoir, Smoak writes about the burden of dealing with two life-threatening illnesses.
 
Bryan Ferry celebrates 40 years of making music by turning to the sounds of the 1920s for his latest album The Jazz Age.  The Bryan Ferry Orchestra revisited 13 of Ferry’s hits over the years, from his Roxy Music days to his solo career, all played in the style of music from the ‘20s.
 

March 23-24, 2013

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Fire and Forget is a collection of stories written by front line soldiers, staff officers and a military spouse.  Roy Scranton was an artilleryman in the Army and is an editor of the new book along with Matt Gallagher, a former Army captain and a Senior Fellow at Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America.  Contributor Phil Klay will join Scranton and Gallagher to discuss their stories and the value of writing after combat.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe

HOUR TWO:  

Math is hard and most of us have very little interest in the subject after graduation. But Oxford professor Marcus du Sautoy has managed to host several films about complex mathematical concepts that are both enjoyed and understood by the general public.  Those documentaries are available as a boxed set of DVDs called The Story of Math.  du Sautoy joins Bob to explain why we should be in awe of mathematics instead of fear it.

Bob talks with former NPR colleagues Gwen Thompkins and Sean Collins about their public radio show called Music Inside Out.  Thompkins hosts the program from New Orleans and Collins produces it in St. Louis. They discuss the show’s regular format and we hear songs from a special playlist they assembled to get us from Ash Wednesday to Easter.

 

 

March 30-31, 2013

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Everyone knows that the Bible is the top best-selling book in history. In part, that achievement comes from a spread of disparate versions, translations and adaptations for all walks of life - and at least two dozen retellings for children, some with superheroes.  Most of those versions are not based on new scholarship, but that was the genesis of “The New New Testament: A Bible for the 21st Century Combining Traditional and Newly Discovered Texts.” Bob talks with the editor, Hal Taussig, a pastor and professor who teaches at Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe

HOUR TWO:

Inspired by the real-life story of a German con man who posed as a member of the wealthy Rockefeller family, writer Amity Gaige’s novel Schroder is a story about parenthood, love, and deception.

Bob talks with the 2013 Caldecott Medal winner Jon Klassen, author and illustrator of This Is Not My Hat and 2011’s I Want My Hat Back

Singer-songwriter Josh Ritter has a knack for creating beautiful stream-of-consciousness lyrics whether it be a single bittersweet memory about “Kathleen” or a heartfelt plea for women veterans as voiced in “Girl in the War.”  His latest album, The Beast in Its Tracks, was written after his heartbreaking divorce, but it’s not as dire as you might think.  Josh sits with Bob to explain why, and how he got to “Hopeful.”