Archive
Schedule

Sirius XM Insight

XM 121/Sirius 205

M-F 6 AM (ET)

M-F 7 AM

M-F 8 AM

Bob Elsewhere

Subscribe to me on YouTube

Subscribe To Our Blog

Bob Edwards Weekend – March 2012 

March 3-4

HOUR ONE:

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

In Panther Baby: A Life of Rebellion & Reinvention, Jamal Joseph vividly recounts his introduction to the Black Panther organization and his progression from a young, naïve street kid to a confident and outspoken member of an influential national movement, and later to an Oscar nominee and professor at an Ivy League college.

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of Elizabeth Onusko.  Memories are important to everyone, but some of us need a little help keeping those memories fresh.  Onusko is a saver. She keeps ticket stubs, playbills, birthday cards and any other tiny memento that might help her remember a point in her life. Onusko says that when she looks through all of the material she’s accumulated, she feels like she’s going back in time, visiting herself at a younger age.

HOUR TWO:

In scientific language, gravity is still known as a theory but no one questions its existence and its effects. The same cannot be said for another important concept. The “theory” of evolution is not debatable, like gravity it’s actually a scientific fact. Prehistorian and popular-science writer Cameron Smith lays out the evidence and logic in his latest book The Fact of Evolution.

Katherine Boo has chronicled the story of people struggling to live in one of contemporary India’s most notorious slums, nestled in the shadow of luxury hotels. Her latest book is titled Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity. Boo has won both the Pulitzer Prize and a MacArthur “Genius” Award for reporting on poverty.

 

March 10-11

HOUR ONE:

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Pulitzer Prize winner Chris Hedges was a foreign correspondent for The New York Times for fifteen years until he was reprimanded for denouncing President George W. Bush’s invasion of Iraq.  Now he’s a columnist, senior fellow at The Nation Institute, and has taught at Columbia, New York and Princeton universities.  In his most recent book, The World As It Is: Dispatches on the Myth of Human Progress, Hedges warns, “Brace yourself.  The American Empire is over. And the descent is going to be horrifying.”

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of michael taylor.  In an age of Facebook friends and Twitter followers, many people behave like they are the stars of their own reality TV shows, often imitating the actions of pop culture celebrities.  taylor doesn’t look for role models on TV or the movies. His heroine is his mother, who never gave an inch in the face of life’s unforgiving challenges.

HOUR TWO:

Opposition research, “oppo” to insiders, has become a standard part of the political campaign process … and the slimiest. In politics, finding the dirt on a candidate is multi-million dollar business, and Alan Huffman has made his fair share of the money after nearly two decades as an opposition researcher. The former journalist has recently co-authored a book about how the process works. It’s titled We’re With Nobody: Two Insiders Reveal the Dark Side of American Politics

Bob talks with multi-instrumentalist Andrew Bird about his new CD called Break It Yourself. Primarily known as a violinist, Bird has been playing since he was four, and collaborated with the Squirrel Nut Zippers during their later recordings.

 

March 17-18

HOUR ONE:

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

In 1962, musician Paddy Moloney founded a traditional Irish music group called The Chieftains.  Now, this Grammy-winning ensemble has produced 40 albums and is responsible for sharing Irish music with the world.  Celebrating their 50th anniversary, The Chieftains recently released Voice of Ages, a collaboration with Bon Iver, The Decemberists, the Punch Brothers and many other contemporary musicians.

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of Betsy Buchalter Adler.  Science tells us that pets are good for our health. Pet owners have lower blood pressure and a lower likelihood of depression.  Adler says walking her dog makes her lighten up and pay attention to the unexpected small delights of the world. And the more time she spends contemplating those small delights, the less time she spends worrying about the never-ending annoyances of her work life.

HOUR TWO:

Eyal Press has written for The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Magazine, and The Nation. Drawing on research by sociologists, psychologists, neuroscientists, political activists and theorists, Press’s new book explores the question of what compels a person to stage an act of resistance. It’s titled Beautiful Souls: Saying No, Breaking Ranks, and Heeding the Voice of Conscience in Dark Times.

Travel writer Pico Iyer crosses the globe in this very personal exploration of his similarities and life-time connection with writer Graham Greene. Iyer’s book is titled The Man Within My Head.

 

March 24-25 

HOUR ONE:

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Clay Johnson says we not only suffer from information overload, but we have lost the ability to filter the average eleven hours of data we ingest every day.  He describes the problem and offers some advice in a new book, The Information Diet: a Case for Conscious Consumption.

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of Matt Rizzotti. Paramedics and firefighters see people during the worst moments of their lives. The strangers they meet are watching their possessions turn to ash, or sitting by while a loved one dies unexpectedly. Rizzotti is a volunteer firefighter and an emergency medical technician. He says it’s deeply rewarding to help people in such vulnerable circumstances, and that his job has taught him to treasure every moment he shares with loved ones.

HOUR TWO:

Bob talks with Mark Johnson, the founder of Playing for Change and the producer of two albums recorded by the musicians Johnson has met since he started the organization in 2004. The group’s breakout hit was a cover of “Stand by Me” recorded by many different musicians around the world and in their own style. Johnson’s video mixed all the performances together and has more than 40 million views on YouTube. There is also a Playing for Change non-profit organization which helps build music schools in developing countries and aims to connect the world through music.

Bob talks with Clarence Bekker, “Grandpa” Elliott Small and Jason Tamba, just a few of the international musicians affiliated with Playing for Change. Those three will sing a few songs for us in our performance studio. The band’s latest recording is PFC 2: Songs Around the World and group member Clarence Bekker also has a brand new solo CD called Old Soul.

 

March 31 - April 1

HOUR ONE:

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

David Unger is an editorial writer at The New York Times where he’s covered foreign policy, international economics, and the military for more than three decades.  He’s been on the editorial board for 22 years and now has written a book called The Emergency State: America’s Pursuit of Absolute Security at All Costs.

We remember singer-songwriter Eric Lowen.  In 2006, Bob talked with Lowen and his musical partner Dan Navarro. The two met as singing waiters and wrote Pat Benatar’s smash hit “We Belong.”  In 2004, Lowen was diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s Disease. Lowen died on March 23 at the age of 60.

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of Fred D’Aguiar. There are some things we do that have no purpose beyond bringing joy. Dance is one of those things. D’Aguiar is a poet, and a dancer. He says that dance is also magical and curative. D’Aguiar’s multicutural childhood, spread over two continents, taught his body to move in unique ways that inspire him to this day.

HOUR TWO:

Bob talks with Jeff Forshaw and Brian Cox.  Forshaw is a theoretical physics professor and Cox is a professor of particle physics and host of the Discovery Channel series Wonders of the Universe. They have co-authored The Quantum Universe, which is a follow up their best-selling book Why Does E=mc2.  In their latest book, Forshaw and Cox explain quantum mechanics and why it matters in everyday life.

Humans have a natural desire to live with others, not alone. But Eric Klinenberg argues that during the past half century, our species has undergone a remarkable social experiment. For the first time in all of human history, vast numbers of people are living alone. In 1950, only 22 percent of Americans were single. Today, more than 50 percent are unmarried and 31 million adults live alone.  Klinenberg explores what this means for our society in his new book Going Solo.