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Bob Edwards Weekend

March 2011

March 5-6, 2011

HOUR ONE:

Despite ample evidence that there is no connection between autism and vaccines, the rates of unvaccinated children continue to rise. And even though the doctor whose research initially caused the widespread alarm was recently barred from practicing medicine, B-list celebrities like Jenny McCarthy continue to receive ample media time to spread the myth. In his new book, The Panic Virus, science journalist Seth Mnookin investigates this story of medicine, science and fear. 

When they were eight years old, Allen Shawn’s twin sister Mary was diagnosed with autism and sent away to live in an institution. Their father was the storied New Yorker editor William Shawn, and after Mary was institutionalized, the Shawn’s would occasionally take the limousine to go visit her.  In Twin: A Memoir, Allen Shawn shares a story about family secrets and lifelong guilt grounded in the history and science of autism.

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of Elise Forier Edie.  She is a professional playwright, a teacher and also an addict. In her essay, Edie writes frankly about the realities of addiction and recovery. She says that through all the changes in her life, her addiction remains. Each day, she fights a careful, methodical battle against her addiction, trimming her life into manageable moments.

HOUR TWO:

Lions are among the world’s most beloved animals, but they and other ‘big cats’ face an uphill battle for survival. In the 1940s, there were nearly a half-million lions in the wild, today their numbers have dwindled to about 20,000. Dereck & Beverly Joubert live alongside these regal animals in Bostwana, and their film, The Last Lions is being released by National Geographic in conjunction with the ‘Big Cats Initiative.’ The Jouberts join Bob to discuss the global effort to keep big cats safe from extinction.

Harvard professor and author Peter J. Gomes was an American Baptist minister who served in the Memorial Church since 1970. Rev. Gomes had independent views on everything from the morality of war to same-sex marriage. To remember the late professor, we’re replaying a portion of Bob’s conversation with Gomes, which covered the religious and cultural divide in America. Peter Gomes died on February 28th at the age of 68.

 

March 12-13, 2011

HOUR ONE:

Bob pays tribute to Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post columnist David Broder who had been a weekly news analyst for our satellite radio show since 2004.  Last year, the two shared a conversation that went beyond current political headlines - Bob talked with Broder about his long and storied journalism career. David Broder died Wednesday at the age of 81. 

Writer Paula McLain combines fact with fictionalized dialogue in The Paris Wife, a historical novel about Hadley Richardson, the first wife of Ernest Hemingway. The plot focuses on their time in Paris and Europe with other ex-pats during the 1920s.

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of Kimberly Woodbury, a student at the Episcopal Seminary at Yale. She is fascinated by the relationship between science and faith. After her graduation, Woodbury will work as an Episcopal priest and chemistry teacher in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. She sees the Big Bang and the story of Genesis as two sides of the same coin.

HOUR TWO:

The ancient Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan is said to be one of the happiest places on earth and one that has been isolated from industrialization until relatively recently. Instead of anxiously tracking its GNP, Bhutan measures its success in Gross National Happiness.  Radio journalist Lisa Napoli moved to Bhutan to help start a radio station, Kuzoo FM. She writes about the experience in her new book, Radio Shangri-La: What I Learned in Bhutan, the Happiest Kingdom on Earth.

Bob talks with Sean Lennon and his girlfriend Charlotte Kemp Muhl about their band The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger. Sean is the only child of John Lennon and Yoko Ono and Charlotte is better known as a fashion model who is now returning to her musical roots. They’ve released the band’s first CD called Acoustic Sessions and they perform several of the songs for us in studio.

 

March 19-20, 2011

HOUR ONE:

Bob talks with Jake Shimabukuro about his music and his chosen instrument. The native Hawaiian has been called “the Jimi Hendrix of the ukulele” and Shimabukuro’s latest CD is titled Peace Love Ukulele. He’ll perform several new and old songs for us in our studio.

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of David Adinaro.   As a teenager, Adinaro felt called to practice emergency medicine. He’s now the chief of adult emergency medicine at St. Joseph’s Regional Medical Center in Paterson, New Jersey. He tries to establish a personal connection with patients, to carve out time for compassion in a busy schedule. 

HOUR TWO:

This is the time of year that high school seniors nervously check the mailbox, waiting to receive their college acceptance and rejection letters.  In Crazy U: One Dad’s Crash Course in Getting His Kid into College, Andrew Ferguson shares his family’s experience with the college admissions process.

Long before his Oscar-winning performance in Little Miss Sunshine, actor Alan Arkin was a favorite of both critics and audiences alike.  A skilled comedian, Arkin first came to popular notice in the 1966 farce The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming, which earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Actor.  Since then, Arkin has acted in and directed some 100 films, many of which he writes about in his new memoir titled An Improvised Life

 

March 19-20, 2011

HOUR ONE:

Bob talks with Jake Shimabukuro about his music and his chosen instrument. The native Hawaiian has been called “the Jimi Hendrix of the ukulele” and Shimabukuro’s latest CD is titled Peace Love Ukulele. He’ll perform several new and old songs for us in our studio.

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, we hear the essay of David Adinaro.   As a teenager, Adinaro felt called to practice emergency medicine. He’s now the chief of adult emergency medicine at St. Joseph’s Regional Medical Center in Paterson, New Jersey. He tries to establish a personal connection with patients, to carve out time for compassion in a busy schedule. 

HOUR TWO:

This is the time of year that high school seniors nervously check the mailbox, waiting to receive their college acceptance and rejection letters.  In Crazy U: One Dad’s Crash Course in Getting His Kid into College, Andrew Ferguson shares his family’s experience with the college admissions process.

Long before his Oscar-winning performance in Little Miss Sunshine, actor Alan Arkin was a favorite of both critics and audiences alike.  A skilled comedian, Arkin first came to popular notice in the 1966 farce The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming, which earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Actor.  Since then, Arkin has acted in and directed some 100 films, many of which he writes about in his new memoir titled An Improvised Life

Bob Edwards Weekend is heard on XM 133 & Sirius 196 on Saturdays from 7-9 AM EST.