Archive
Schedule

Sirius XM Insight

XM 121/Sirius 205

M-F 6 AM (ET)

M-F 7 AM

M-F 8 AM

Bob Elsewhere

Subscribe to me on YouTube

Subscribe To Our Blog

 

Bob Edwards Weekend - December 2012

December 1-2

HOUR ONE: 

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

American historian Harlow Giles Unger takes a fresh look at our nation’s sixth president in his new biography John Quincy Adams.  Raised by John and Abigail Adams to be a great leader, Quincy Adams’ political career spanned the administrations of George Washington to Abraham Lincoln.

Then, in our latest This I Believe essay, we’ll conclude our month long series on the sacrifices made by service members and their families.  This time we hear from Jill Biden, the wife of Vice President Joe Biden. Their son Beau was deployed to Iraq in 2008. Her major initiative as second lady is a group called Joining Forces which supports veterans and their families.

HOUR TWO:

Irish singer-songwriter Susan McKeown pays homage to her adopted homeland with her latest albumBelong.  McKeown moved to New York City from Ireland in the 1990s, building a successful music career that has taken her from Klezmer to African sounds, and earned McKeown a Grammy along the way.

When an author dies, usually our only way to peek into his personal life is by parsing lines of prose. Then there’s Kurt Vonnegut, who wrote enough personal letters, when he wasn’t writing novels and short stories, to fill decades, and more than 400 pages, in the new book, Kurt Vonnegut: Letters. The volume is edited by Dan Wakefield, a friend of Vonnegut, and fellow writer and native Hoosier.

 

December 8-9

HOUR ONE: 

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

David Von Drehle has pinpointed 1862 as “the most eventful year in American history.” He writes about it in his new book Rise to Greatness: Abraham Lincoln and America’s Most Perilous Year. Drehle is the editor-at-large at TIME magazine and also the author of Triangle: The Fire That Changed America.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.  We’ll hear from essayist Tanuj Bansal about the stresses and joys of family visits during the holidays.

HOUR TWO:

 We remember jazz legend Dave Brubeck.  His hit “Take Five” became a jazz standard and the bestselling jazz song of all time.  In 2005, Bob talked with Brubeck about his life, music career and military service. Dave Brubeck died Wednesday at the age of 91. 

Bob sits down for a performance chat with pianist Chad Lawson.  He’s an award-winning pianist and his latest CD is titled The Piano.  They discuss what it’s like to be an independent artist trying to make a career in today’s music world.

 

December 15-16

HOUR ONE: 

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Timothy Egan recounts the life and career of the turn-of-the-century’s most famous photographer, Edward Curtis.  Egan’s book is titled Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher: The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

HOUR TWO:

Ralph Nader, named by The Atlantic as one of the 100 most influential figures in American history, joins Bob to discuss current affairs and his new book The Seventeen Solutions: Bold Ideas for Our American Future. 

As the son of jazz guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli, John Pizzarelli grew up surrounded by music royalty.  Benny Goodman and Les Paul were regular guests in their home, and John has performed with the likes of Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Rosemary Clooney, James Taylor and Paul McCartney.  Pizzarelli is a talented musician leading a band of his own now and shares stories from his life with Bob.  His musical memoir is titled World on a String.

 

December 22-23

 

HOUR ONE:

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

In August 2011, after serving 17 years in prison for the murder of three young boys, the “West Memphis Three” were released.  Damien Echols, Jessie Misskelley, Jr. and Jason Baldwin entered so-called Alford pleas which says, “I’m guilty but I didn’t do it.”  Amy Berg’s new documentary, West of Memphis, features previously unknown affidavits about the stepfather of one of the murdered boys.  Berg will join Damien Echols and his wife Lorri Davis to discuss the new evidence, how film can influence justice, and the possibility of reopening the case.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

HOUR TWO:

Grammy award-winning violinist Mark O’Connor talks with Bob about his career and most recent album, America on Strings, as well as about his holiday album, An Appalachian Christmas

It’s time once again for our annual tradition of wrapping up the year in music just in time to help you finish your holiday shopping list. Bob talks with Rolling Stone contributing editor Anthony DeCurtis who shares his favorite albums of the year.

 

December 29-30

HOUR ONE:

Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus joins Bob to look back at the biggest news events from 2012.

Since it is no surprise that good writers are also good readers, it shouldn’t surprise anyone that these good writers and readers are also passionate advocates for good bookstores.  The title of editor Ronald Rice’s book explains it all: My Bookstore: Writers Celebrate Their Favorite Places to Browse, Read, and Shop.  Rice and writer Ann Patchett talk with Bob about why physical bookstores are important to our society. Patchett co-owns a bookstore in Nashville.

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.  This week, essayist Debi Knight Kennedy describes what an old seashell taught her about aging gracefully.

HOUR TWO:

It’s been 200 years since the Brothers Grimm first shared their collection of fairy tales with children and adults alike.  The lure of “once upon a time” captured people’s imagination, making Hansel and Gretel,CinderellaRapunzel and many others some of the Western world’s most beloved stories.  Harvard professor Maria Tatar edited The Annotated Brothers Grimm and talks with Bob about these enticing and often grisly tales.

Bob talks with Salon.com book critic Laura Miller about the best books of 2012.