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Bob Edwards Weekend - August 2014

August 2-3

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.   Then, the latest essay from children’s author and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater.

In 2011, more than a dozen teens in the small town of LeRoy, New York experienced “conversion disorder,” a mysterious malady that results in uncontrollable tics, stutters and seizures.  Novelist Katherine Howe used this real-life incident as the basis for her new book, Conversion.

Bob talks with The Bacon Brothers about their forthcoming album 36 Cents.  The six-piece band features actor Kevin Bacon and his brother, Michael, a film score composer.  Since making the band official in 1995, the Brothers have released seven albums. 

HOUR TWO:

Author David Baldacci’s books have sold more than 110 million copies worldwide.  Now he turns his gifted and charmed pen to writing for young people, with his first fantasy young adult novel titled The Finisher

Bob talks to director Tate Taylor, and actor Chadwick Boseman about their new film, Get on Up.  It’s a biopic about the Godfather of Soul, James Brown. The movie opens this weekend.

 

August 9-10

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Late summer is a perfect time to talk to the authors of The Songs of Insects. Naturalists Lang Elliott and Wil Hershberger join Bob to talk about the chirps, trills and buzzes made by the bugs found in your own backyard.

The title of science writer Marc Abrahams’ new book says it all: This Is Improbable Too: Synchronized Cows, Speedy Brain Extractors, and More WTF Research.  Abrahams is the founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes, and in his new book shares with readers his odd collection of strange scientific findings. Then, the latest essay from children’s author and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater.

HOUR TWO:

Bob talks to actor Brendan Gleeson and John McDonagh who wrote and directed their new film, Calvary. Both men were raised Catholic and Gleeson stars as a beloved but besieged priest in a small Irish village who offers to sacrifice himself for the sins of others.

Bob talks with Roger Blevins Jr. about the music of his oddly named soul band, Mingo Fishtrap.  They combine the sounds of Memphis and New Orleans, with a little north Texas thrown in, to create a funky sound all their own. The group’s latest album is titled On Time.

 

August 16-17

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news. 

Oceanographer Sylvia Earle has spent thousands of hours underwater studying our planet’s marine life and is alarmed by what she’s seen.  After witnessing the glaring effects of pollution, overfishing and climate change, Earle says we must get past the mindset that our oceans are too big to fail.  Bob talks with Earle and with co-director Robert Nixon about their new documentary Mission Blue.  The film opens in select theaters this weekend and will be available everywhere on Netflix.

Then, Bob talks with children’s author and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater about how to teach dogs to read and about his recommendation of a new book titled Sniffer Dogs by Nancy Castaldo.

HOUR TWO:                 

Bob talks with Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan about his latest book.  Not To Be Missedblends cultural criticism with historical anecdotes, and charts Turan’s fifty-four favorite movies from a lifetime of watching films.

Bob talks with Rhett Miller, the founder and lead singer of the Old 97’s, about the band’s two decades together and about the music from their latest album.  Their CD is titled Most Messed Up.

 

August 23-24

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Bob talks to Daniel Lieberman, author of The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health and Disease.  Lieberman is the Chair of the Department of Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.  His book explains how millions of years of evolution have led our bodies to a paradoxical position.  People in developed countries are living longer than ever, having vanquished diseases that used to kill people by the millions:  smallpox, measles, polio and the plague. But we are also afflicted with more chronic, preventable illnesses and ailments, such as diabetes, heart disease, certain cancers, strokes, dementia, depression and anxiety.

Then, the latest essay from children’s author and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater.

HOUR TWO:

Bob talks with Michael Wallis, author of the book The Lincoln Highway: Coast to Coast from Times Square to the Golden Gate.  It’s a trip across the United States through a bygone era, before interstates turned roadside kitsch into monotony.

Salon.com senior book critic Laura Miller shares with Bob books to help us through the final dog days of summer, and she offers a preview of this year’s best fall books.

 

August 30-31
  
HOUR ONE:
 
Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news. Then, the latest essay from children’s author and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater.
 
Bob talks with best-selling author and Time magazine book critic  Lev Grossman about the challenges of writing the third volume of his trilogy. The Magician’s Land is the final installment of Grossman’s Fillory books. Finally, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe
 
HOUR TWO:                 
 
The new film Love Is Strange stars Alfred Molina and John Lithgow as a long-time gay couple.  After spending 39 years together, George and Ben finally get married but they do not get the storybook ending they hoped for. Molina plays George, a Catholic school teacher who is fired after the marriage, sending the newlyweds on a difficult journey.  Molina joins Bob to discuss his career and the new movie. Love Is Strange is now in theaters. 
 
Many of us still remember baseball’s good old days: the ballparks, the legendary players, and the unforgettable play-by-play announcers who brought it right into our homes. Bob talks to Kevin Bender about many of those broadcasting Hall of Famers in his documentary Ball Talk: Baseball’s Voices of Summer.  It’s available on DVD.
 
Bob samples a New Orleans delicacy: a snoball from Hansen’s SnoBliz. Ashley Hansen Springgate runs the business started by her grandparents in 1939.  In fact she still shaves the blocks of ice on the very same machine her grandfather invented and built decades ago.