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Bob Edwards Weekend - April 2014

April 5-6

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Errol Morris spent 33 hours with Donald Rumsfeld to make his new film, The Unknown Known.  But unlike The Fog of War, his previous documentary about a former Secretary of Defense, the star of this film is unapologetic. Morris says that the movie he made with Rumsfeld is vastly different from The Fog of War: “It is a character study of a very different kind of character: it is about a mind that appears to be open but may in fact be locked up like a safe.”

HOUR TWO:

As fans gather to watch the NCAA basketball championships and obsess over their brackets, Bob Edwards takes a look at the treatment of athletes in big-time college sports and the impact of big-money sports programs on higher education.  Bob’s investigation features SiriusXM’s own Dave Zirin and includes the voices of Len Elmore and other former players; college officials like University of West Virginia president Gordon Gee, who had a controversial tenure at Ohio State; and journalists who have covered college sports, including John Feinstein.  It’s an hour-long look behind the hoopla, called “Dropping the Ball: The Shady Side of Big-Time College Sports.

 

April 12-13

HOUR ONE:
 
Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.
 
It is not new news that Americans take less vacation and work more hours than any other population. But what is all of this work doing to us? Washington Post reporter Brigid Schulte’s new book, Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time, looks at the facts behind our culture of busyness.
 
HOUR TWO:
 
Hateship Loveship is a new film adapted from a short story by Nobel laureate Alice Munro. Bob talks with director Liza Johnson and actress Kristen Wiig about this story of unlikely friendship and love. 
 
David Crosby is a two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee – for his work with The Byrds and Crosby, Stills & Nash. Now Crosby has released Croz, his first solo studio album in over 20 years.  Bob talks with Crosby about his career and his latest work.
 
 
April 19-20
 
HOUR ONE: 
 

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Even when we ask a work colleague or a close friend for an honest opinion, we often aren’t ready to hear what they have to say. To teach us all to become better listeners, Bob talks with Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen, the authors of Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well.

HOUR TWO:

Conservationist and founder of the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Dave Goulson found his passion for bees as a young boy in rural England. His book, A Sting in the Tale: My Adventures with Bumblebees, looks at why bees worldwide are declining and what we can do about it.

Actor John Turturro has appeared in four films by the Coen Brothers, nine Spike Lee joints and all three of the Transformers blockbuster movies. His latest film is Fading Gigolo, which he wrote, directed and stars in.  It includes a stellar cast, featuring Woody Allen as Turturro’s pimp. We’ll discuss the new movie and Turturro’s eclectic acting career.

 

April 26-27

HOUR ONE:
    

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Cesar Chavez died two decades ago but his legacy is still felt today. Miriam Pawel is the author of The Crusades of Cesar Chavez, the first comprehensive biography of the labor leader that explores his work on behalf of migrant workers and his “profound humanity.”

Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe. This week we hear from Kentucky poet George Ella Lyon. She believes in the importance of maintaining a good relationship with nature.

HOUR TWO:

If you google the name Vivian Maier today, you will get nearly a million hits. But just a few years ago, you would have gotten one: an obituary from the Chicago Tribune placed by three people unrelated to her. Vivian Maier died in 2009, and the fascinating story of her posthumous rise to fame is told in a new documentary titled Finding Vivian Maier. Bob learns more about her story from the film’s producersJohn Maloof and Charlie Siskel.

“I’m mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this anymore!” These iconic words were spoken by the fictitious anchorman Howard Beale in the 1976 movie Network. In Mad as Hell: The Making of Network and the Fateful Vision of the Angriest Man in MoviesDave Itzkoff, a culture reporter for The New York Times, tells the behind-the-scenes story of the film, including how screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky prophetically envisioned the future of mass media.