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Friday
Sep252015

The Bob Edwards Show (September 28-30, 2015) Last Ones Ever

Monday, September 28, 2015: As we near the end of the show, we’re featuring some of our best-loved productions and some real fan favorites. Today, we bring back Bob’s time in the studio with Carol Kaye and her bass guitar. Kaye was the session bassist of the 1960s and 70s, playing on dozens and dozens of hits for the likes of The Beach Boys, Ritchie Valens, Simon & Garfunkel, The Supremes, Ray Charles and the Monkees. It’s estimated that Kaye has been involved with more than ten-thousand recording sessions in her career. Kaye and her bass are also responsible for the distinctive bass notes of the Mission Impossible theme. Bob thoroughly enjoyed this conversation and we think you will too.

Tuesday, September 29, 2015: Bob talks with filmmaker Alex Gibney about his documentary titled Taxi to the Dark Side.  It examines the Bush administration’s policy on torture through the death of taxi driver in Afghanistan.  The film won the 2008 Oscar for best documentary AND a Peabody Award. Then, Marc Maron began his standup career as a contemporary of the late Sam Kinison, and though he’s toured extensively, recorded comedy CDs, appeared on talk shows dozens of times and held prominent jobs in media, personal problems including addiction laid Maron low by 2005. At his nadir, Maron began recording conversations with his friends and fellow comedians for a podcast called “WTF,” which today stands as a cornerstone of the medium. The underdog success of “WTF” sparked a career renaissance for Maron, who has since starred in his own show on the Independent Film Channel and written a book, titled Attempting Normal.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015: For our final broadcast, we offer this gift to you. Bob talks with fan-favorite Jack Gantos about his new book titled The Trouble in Me. We’ll hear from members of the production staff about some of their fondest memories of the show. Next Bob sits down in the studio to be interviewed by Charlie Summers, this program’s biggest fan. Then several of our former contributors and favorite guests wills top by to say so long. We’ll also hear messages of appreciation and farewell from many loyal listeners who wanted to lend their voice to our last show.

 

(That’s it. You have reached the end of The Bob Edwards Show. We hope you enjoyed the ride as much as we did.)

If you want to make sure to find Bob in his new home, please stay in touch:

Email: contact@bobedwardsradio.com 

Or my personal email: chad.campbell3@gmail.com

Website: http://www.bobedwardsradio.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BobEdwardsShow

Friday
Sep252015

Bob Edwards Weekend (September 25-26, 2015) The Last One Ever

HOUR ONE:

Today is the final broadcast of this program. Consider this hour a special parting gift to you – our loyal listeners.  And speaking of listeners, some of you took the time to record personal messages of appreciation and farewell and we’ll share that audio. You’ll also hear from many former producers on their favorite conversations. Several former contributors and fan-favorite guests are saying goodbye too. Bob will also talk with author Jack Gantos about his latest book titled The Trouble in Me and Bob will answer questions himself asked by this show’s biggest fan.

 

HOUR TWO:

We present our two favorite interviews gathered during a reporting trip to Nashville.  First is a visit to the home of Guy Clark to discuss his career, his music and his handmade instruments. Bob talks with Clark in a basement room that performs double duty as a guitar building workshop and as a song writing room. Then Marty Stuart shows us around his stunning personal museum of country music memorabilia.  He shows us artifacts such as Johnny Cash’s first ever black suit, Patsy Cline’s final pair of boots and the handwritten lyrics for some of Hank Williams’ biggest hits.  

Friday
Sep182015

The Bob Edwards Show (September 21-25, 2015)

Monday, September 21, 2015: Bob talks to musician, rehabilitated drug addict, ex-con, liver recipient and sperm donor David Crosby.  We talked about all that and more and he wrote about it in his book titled Since Then: How I Survived EVERYTHING and Lived to Tell About It. We also discuss much of his music as presented in Crosby’s 3-CD boxed set called Voyage.  It features tracks from his time with The Byrds – the super group Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young – and from his solo career.

Tuesday, September 22, 2015: Today we replay our most popular and our most powerful original documentary. It’s one last encore presentation of our award-winning show Stories from Third Med: Surviving a Jungle ER.  The documentary includes stories of the Navy’s Third Medical Battalion, which served alongside the Third Marine Division. They were based near the DMZ, closest to the enemy in North Vietnam. Decades later, the doctors and corpsmen recount the horror they can never forget, and reflect on the forces that drive men to war in the first place.

Wednesday, September 23, 2015: Bob speaks with Larry King at his favorite hangout, the Nate ‘n Al Delicatessen in Beverly Hills. They reminisce about King’s five decades in broadcasting. Then we’ll mark the birthday of Bruce Springsteen. Peter Ames Carlin has written well-regarded and exhaustively researched biographies on Paul McCartney and The Beach Boys. He’s also turned his journalistic eye to “The Boss.” Carlin joins Bob to talk about rock-n-roll’s working class hero and his book titled Bruce

Thursday, September 24, 2015: Bob visits with Annie Leibovitz one of the world’s best known photographers.  She’s been the featured portrait photographer for Vanity Fair magazine since 1983, and her images of celebrities and public figures have reached an iconic status.  When she was our guest, Washington DC’s Corcoran Gallery was exhibiting images featured in her book titled Annie Leibovitz At Work. Then, another creative type. Amy Krouse Rosenthal likes to make things: books, for small people and big, short videos, and “connections with the universe.”  Her collection of videos is charming and addictive – in “Life is a Marathon,” she greets commuters exiting the train station with posters, high fives, and water.  Rosenthal talks to Bob about creativity, getting something out of nothing, and why she does what she does.

Friday, September 25, 2015: Today, we present our two favorite interviews gathered during a reporting trip to Nashville.  First is a visit to the home of Guy Clark to discuss his career, his music and his handmade instruments. Bob talks with Clark in a basement room that performs double duty as a guitar building workshop and as a song writing room. Then Marty Stuart shows us around his stunning personal museum of country music memorabilia.  He shows us artifacts such as Johnny Cash’s first ever black suit, Patsy Cline’s final pair of boots and the handwritten lyrics for some of Hank Williams’ biggest hits.  

Friday
Sep182015

Bob Edwards Weekend (September 19-20, 2015)

HOUR ONE:

The Cold War is over and with the collapse of the Soviet Union, there is little threat of an all-out, mutually destructive nuclear war.  But investigative journalist Eric Schlosser points out that most of those weapons are still out there…and many of them are still on hair-trigger alert.  In his book Command and Control, he writes that school children no longer practice to “duck and cover” — even as the danger of an accidental war or accidental nuclear detonations may have increased. Drawing on thousands of pages of recently declassified government documents and on interviews with scores of military personnel and nuclear scientists, Schlosser writes about our illusion of safety when it comes to today’s nuclear weapons.

Then Bob checks in with Washington Post columnist Gene Weingarten on his latest project. Weingarten is still pulling together stories relating to one day chosen at random – December 28, 1986.  The forthcoming book will be called One Day and will prove that old journalism axiom that good stories can be found anywhere.

 

HOUR TWO:

Today we replay our most popular and our most powerful original documentary. It’s one last encore presentation of our award-winning show Stories from Third Med: Surviving a Jungle ER.  The documentary features stories of the Navy’s Third Medical Battalion, which served alongside the Third Marine Division. They were based near the DMZ, closest to the enemy in North Vietnam. They shared their dramatic and emotional stories with us four decades later, told over a soundtrack of the music that meant everything to them in the late 1960s.

 

Friday
Sep112015

The Bob Edwards Show (September 14-18, 2015)

           

Monday, September 14, 2015: Bob talks with Australian writer Tim Winton about his award-winning collection of connected short stories, The Turning: New Stories. In 1998, Australia declared Winton a “national living treasure” and in 2005 the book won the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction. Bob talks with guitarist Ben Harper and harmonica master Charlie Musselwhite about their CD titled Get Up! The two occasional collaborators have wanted to record a full album together for over a decade and finally found the time after first clicking musically at a 1997 recording session with John Lee Hooker. 

 

Tuesday, September 15, 2015: Any fan of Libby Gelman-Waxner’s monthly column, “If You Ask Me,” in Premiere magazine (1987-2007) could tell you all about Libby’s home life and her hilarious observations on Hollywood and films.  But many of those fans never knew that “Libby” was actually a pseudonym for screenwriter, playwright, and novelist Paul Rudnick, one of America’s greatest humorists.  Rudnick talks with Bob about his memoir titled I Shudder: And Other Reactions to Life, Death, and New Jersey. You know “snark” when you hear it: It’s biting, mean, condescension disguised as high-brow teasing.  Maureen Dowd is very good at it, and so was Cicero.  New Yorker film critic David Denby says it is “spreading like pinkeye through the media” and weakening the public discourse.  His book on the subject is titled Snark.

 

Wednesday, September 16, 2015: In his book Freedom’s Forge, Arthur Herman tells a little-known story from World War II: how two American businessmen—the President of General Motors William Knudsen and construction giant Henry Kaiser—oversaw an output of war materials including weapons, tanks, planes, guns, and ammunition – that almost defies imagination. Herman calls it the greatest industrial miracle in history, and makes the case that these men changed the face of not only American business and industry but of American society. Then military journalist and author Stephen Harding shares another unlikely but true story. It’s all in the subtitle of his book The Last Battle: When U.S. and German Soldiers Joined Forces in the Waning Hours of World War II in Europe.

 

Thursday, September 17, 2015: Mark Frauenfelder is co-founder of the most popular blog in the world www.boingboing.net and Editor in Chief of Make magazine, which advocates for Americans to re-engage with the physical world.  Bob talks to Frauenfelder about the Do-it-yourself movement and its promise to reinvigorate traditional American values like resourcefulness, creativity and thrift.  He also has some good ideas about how to have fun making cool stuff and reducing the amount of disposable items in our lives. Then Bob talks to Rafe Sagarin, marine ecologist and author of Learning from the Octopus: How Secrets from Nature Can Help Us Fight Terrorist Attacks, Natural Disasters and Disease.

 

Friday, September 18, 2015: The Cold War is over and with the collapse of the Soviet Union, there is little threat of an all-out, mutually destructive nuclear war.  But investigative journalist Eric Schlosser points out that most of those weapons are still out there…and many of them are still on hair-trigger alert.  In his book Command and Control, he writes that school children no longer practice to “duck and cover” — even as the danger of an accidental war or accidental nuclear detonations may have increased. Drawing on thousands of pages of recently declassified government documents and on interviews with scores of military personnel and nuclear scientists, Schlosser writes about our illusion of safety when it comes to today’s nuclear weapons. Then Bob checks in with Washington Post columnist Gene Weingarten on his latest project. Weingarten is still pulling together stories relating to one day chosen at random – December 28, 1986.  The forthcoming book will be called One Day and will prove that old journalism axiom that good stories can be found anywhere.